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Career Opportunities for a Certified Professional Coder

New certifications often lead to new career opportunities. This is the case with the Professional Coder Online Certification and Training Program. As a Certified Professional Coder (CPC), you can serve a vital role for doctors and other medical professionals, all while earning far more than your non-certified counterparts.

There are plenty of career opportunities for a certified professional coder, and today we’ll provide eight different possibilities. But before we do that, let’s take a look at what CPC certification entails, and the skills you’ll have once you’re certified.

Certified Professional Coder (CPC) Certification Details

The first step in becoming a CPC involves passing the CPC certification exam. Once you’ve done that, you’re designated as a CPC-A (apprentice). Then, once you gain a year of coding experience, you’re officially classified as a CPC.

As a CPC, you’ll know how to read a medical chart and assign the correct diagnosis (ICD-10), as well as procedure codes (CPT and HCPCS) for a wide variety of clinical cases and services. You’ll also be qualified for other revenue cycle and reimbursement duties in doctor’s offices, clinics, ambulatory facilities, and other healthcare settings.

Specifically, you’ll be able to perform the following duties:

Having the CPC certification will make you an attractive job candidate for many healthcare-related organizations (and many of the organizations are growing by leaps and bounds due to increased demand). Better yet, having the certification will allow you to earn 20% more than non-certified coders.

Certified Professional Coder (CPC) Jobs and Salary Ranges

With a CPC certification, you’ll have the opportunity to serve in different roles. Here are eight examples, along with salary ranges:

Billing and Coding Support: In a Billing and Coding Support role, you’ll review medical procedures as documented by doctors, as well as translate medical procedures into codes for payers, other medical coders, and medical facilities. Also, you’ll transmit coded patient treatment information to payers and other recipients, coordinate insurance reimbursement of care providers, and handle patient billing.

Salary Range: $25,000–$58,000

Professional Medical Coder: As a Professional Medical Coder, you’ll play an important role in healthcare settings. You’ll work in hospitals, clinics, and physicians' offices to obtain accurate reimbursement for healthcare claims. They also utilize specialized medical classification software to assign procedure and diagnosis codes for insurance billing.

Salary Range: $28,000–$56,000

Professional Fee Coder: The Professional Fee Coder job has some similarities with the Professional Medical Coder role. For example, you’ll also work in hospitals, clinics, and physicians' offices to obtain accurate reimbursement for healthcare claims, as well as utilize specialized medical classification software to assign procedure and diagnosis codes for insurance billing.

Salary Range: $28,000–$56,000

Surgical Coder: Surgical Coders help facilitate a smoother billing process by checking doctors' notes, tests, images, and patients' medical records, and then assigning codes that represent every step of the patient's experience with the physician to confirm what services were provided. This is one of the higher-paying roles for a CPC-certified job candidate.

Salary Range: $29,000–$71,000

Coding Specialist: Coding Specialists also work in various healthcare settings to obtain accurate reimbursement for healthcare claims. Much like Professional Medical Coders and Professional Fee Coders, they rely on specialized medical classification software to assign procedure and diagnosis codes to make sure insurance billing is correct.

Salary Ranges: $30,000–$64,000

Outpatient Medical Coder: As an Outpatient Medical Coder, you’ll perform many of the same daily tasks referenced previously. However, you’ll do this specifically for outpatient procedures.

Salary Range: $28,000–$61,000

Charge Master: As a Charge Master, you’ll build and maintain charge master records so charges can be processed in a timely, accurate, and compliant manner. You’ll also apply your knowledge of billing and coding processes to be compliant with CMS and Health Plan policies, maintain the charge master computer software, and monitor any related databases.

Salary Range: $24,000–$40,000

Medical Records Technician: In the Medical Records Technician role, you’re responsible for maintaining the files included in a patient's health information portfolio, including medical history, symptoms, examination results, diagnostic tests, treatment methods, and other services.

Salary Range: $25,000–$52,000

There’s No Better Time to Get CPC-Certified

With healthcare organizations struggling to keep up with increased healthcare needs, it’s a field rife with job opportunities and career paths. And being CPC-certified gives you an advantage over non-certified medical coders, as well as the potential to thrive in one of these eight jobs. No matter your specific job title, Certified Professional Coders ensure the accuracy of the information flow between doctors, patients, and insurance companies, which is critical to the success of all three parties and maintaining a high level of care and a positive overall experience for patients.

Interested in receiving your CPC certification? Learn more about MedCert’s certification program now.

Do you want to discuss your career path?

Request a FREE consultation with one of our Education Consultants.

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If you are a military spouse or your training is provided through the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA), you may be eligible for financial assistance to cover all or some of your tuition.

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